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Old 01-25-2019, 08:22 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Newbie questions #2

Hi folks, this is a great site! I just completed pens #2-6 and have 5 more to do in this run. I’ll try to attach a pic.
My questions are:
How often, during the turning of one pen do most people resharpen their tools? (I’m not using carbide cutters)
My last few pens, while I was turning them I got a vibration noise. Upon stopping the lathe I found ‘scalloped’ markings on the blank. I then used very light pressure with a large resharpened skew to smooth it out. Why am I getting that vibration? I’m using a dedicated arbor and live center. Since I have a Shopsmith I feed the quill until the end of the arbor meets the live center. Could I be putting too much pressure on it, distorting the arbor enough to make it wobble? It’s definitely not loose.
Thanks!


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Old 01-25-2019, 08:52 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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One way to reduce vibration is to change the speed of the lathe; sometimes faster, sometimes slower will work
If that doesn't do it, then reach under the tool rest with a finger and press against the back of the blank. This will give additional support and can reduce or eliminate vibration. Use just enough pressure to offset the pressure of the cutting tool. If your finger gets hot, you are pressing too hard with the tool.
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:11 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Speed does affect it, and so does sharpness.
Loose fittings along with a slightly dull tool. On wood lathes, the wood lathe comes with a tail stock center that is made for wood, not metal mandrels. Often times that wood tail stock center will wallow around in the end of the mandrel and chatter will occur. Mandrels need a 60° center, not the ones that come standard on wood lathes.


I sharpen my favorite HSS tool on a sharpener about once every 3 to 4 pens; However, I have a hone beside the lathe and hone it (swipe it) across the leather strop with honing compound on it - 3 to 4 times per pen; sometimes more.
I also have a glass plate with 4 grades of micron sandpaper on it. I swipe it across each of those down to the finest between pens.

My sharpener shapes and keeps the shape; the hone keeps it sharp.

I use light pressure and let the tool do the cutting, not the force of my hand. It is a matter of "feel" and it doesn't take long to recognize the right "feel."
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:40 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Are you doing 2 blanks at once and how far apart is your mandrel?? It is so much better to do one blank at a time and just do not see the need to do both of the same mandrel. What save a couple seconds to change out. Really you will find a comfort zone and doing one blank at a time is mine. Shorten the length of the mandrel and get the head stock close to the tail stock and you take out alot of the whipping action.

Also as you found out already sharp is the key word. I will always hone my skew just before the final passes on a blank. I will tell you I can go right to polishing or finishing if it is wood. Love the skew.

Another thing is you want the right angle for both the tool rest and the presentation of the tool. So many videos out there on this stuff. Also the tool rest should be the right distance away from the blank. You do have to move towards the blank after you get close to finished size. That is almost guarenteed.

Finally learn to control your tool and have a good base with your body and holding the tool firmly as you slide your fingers down the tool rest. Some materials will just be more tempermental than others and they all do not react the same. The more you do the more different materials you use you will get the feel and you will be answering these same questions when the next newbie asks them.
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Old 01-26-2019, 03:49 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I agree with all the above. Something I have seen in the tool control area is people take a sharp tool but use it to flat or strait into the side, maybe holding the handle to high would be a way to describe what I am trying to say and it creates lots of vibration instead of cutting clean. If someone with experience could watch you turn it might shorten the learning curve. But have fun and the problem solving is part of that for me. Oh and turning between centers solves some problems, I wish I had learned that at the start.
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Old 01-26-2019, 09:57 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KLJ View Post
I agree with all the above. Something I have seen in the tool control area is people take a sharp tool but use it to flat or strait into the side, maybe holding the handle to high would be a way to describe what I am trying to say and it creates lots of vibration instead of cutting clean. If someone with experience could watch you turn it might shorten the learning curve. But have fun and the problem solving is part of that for me. Oh and turning between centers solves some problems, I wish I had learned that at the start.
I try to use a shearing cut with the skew, and I find the gouges cut smoothly when freshly sharp but with acrylester avoiding chip outs is a real challenge.
Regarding tool angle, where do most people position the tool rest? Center, above or below?
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Old 01-26-2019, 10:40 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasboy1 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by KLJ View Post
I agree with all the above. Something I have seen in the tool control area is people take a sharp tool but use it to flat or strait into the side, maybe holding the handle to high would be a way to describe what I am trying to say and it creates lots of vibration instead of cutting clean. If someone with experience could watch you turn it might shorten the learning curve. But have fun and the problem solving is part of that for me. Oh and turning between centers solves some problems, I wish I had learned that at the start.
I try to use a shearing cut with the skew, and I find the gouges cut smoothly when freshly sharp but with acrylester avoiding chip outs is a real challenge.
Regarding tool angle, where do most people position the tool rest? Center, above or below?
Depends on the tool and as I said find yourself some videos. Again Ed from Exotics has a ton of videos that he uploaded to his site and believe they are also in the library or a link to them is in the library. He is and hope I am not offending him an ordinary pen turner so learning from someone like that takes on more meaning because he speaks our language. Check them out and they will help in alot of your questions. Good luck.
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Old 01-27-2019, 09:22 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Where do I find Ed from Exotics? Are you referring to the ‘Exoticblanks’ supplier?
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Old 01-27-2019, 09:52 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Where do I find Ed from Exotics? Are you referring to the ‘Exoticblanks’ supplier?
Yes go to vendors forum and click on Exoticblanks site and follow your nose.
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Old 01-27-2019, 01:10 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jttheclockman View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasboy1 View Post
Where do I find Ed from Exotics? Are you referring to the ‘Exoticblanks’ supplier?
Yes go to vendors forum and click on Exoticblanks site and follow your nose.
And so the journey begins...be warned that their orders ship with peanut M & M's which add to the addictive forces already in play!!

That said, Ed (and Dawn) is a treasure trove of turning and marketing knowledge. His videos are a good education.
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