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Old 11-06-2017, 04:23 PM   #21 (permalink)
 
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Tim, tried that too. I'm going to see if I can fine-tune my drill press for drilling.
I made sure all the screws and locking gadgets were tight or snug to prevent any play in the quill or tailstock. Same with the chuck and headstock.
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Old 11-07-2017, 07:18 AM   #22 (permalink)
 
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Is the over size hole is on the bit entrance side of the blank? Stop the lathe or drill while withdrawing the drill bit, insert the drill bit into the hole before starting the lathe or drill.

Check drill bit for bends. Roll on the top of a flat surface (like a table saw) to detect bend drill bits. They can be bent even when new!
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:56 AM   #23 (permalink)
 
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I do not max out the Quills travel, I only drill a short distance., back it up and push into the hole and restart. I do this all the time. It takes longer but it works in keeping hole straight.The further the quill is extended, the more movement/vibration there is. When you consider the length of the bit and the quill, well its pretty far out there. Good Luck, Carl
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Old 11-07-2017, 10:48 AM   #24 (permalink)
 
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Thanks, Carl. I have several pieces of 3/4x3/4 hardwood that I can experiment with.
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:54 PM   #25 (permalink)
 
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I recently drilled a large hole completely through some wood pen blanks.
The blanks were all about .750" to .797"and none of them were exactly square. The hole I drilled was a 43/64 (.672")reduced shank jobber drill bit. No smaller bit was used prior to the 43/64" bit.
Each time I tried to make sure the drill bit was drilling the center of the blank and I drill half way thru from each end. I marked the centers with a 3/32" drill bit about 1/8" deep before starting the process. I did 3 of them and they all had some degree of difference where the holes met in the middle. None of the split or blew apart. When I drilled them, I backed the bit out about 6 times on each end and I DID NOT start the lathe for the next plunge with the bit inside the blank.
Then, I tried another one but this time I ran a starter bit into the centers.
When I began the drilling, I made sure the blank was spinning centered by noting the starter bit hole. I made sure it was not wavering.
This time there is such a small difference where the holes met in the middle it is almost not noticeable.
If the blank is running true to center and the lathe is set with the axis of the chucks aligned, the blank should not even move from center when you start the next plunge. If there is a wobble or vibration, then something is not set correctly.
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Old 11-08-2017, 04:08 PM   #26 (permalink)
 
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Throw a cow in and break off the tail........LOL
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Old 11-08-2017, 05:10 PM   #27 (permalink)
 
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The problem is the lathe. A wood lathe isn't designed to maintain accuracy when loosening the tailstock and retightening it. There is discrepancies when doing this. The tailstock has enough play, that it will not tighten back into the same position without some extra precautions.

The only way to ensure a perfect hole, is to use a metal lathe using the auto-feed. First, chuck the blank and use a center drill. Then move the tailstock into position to support the end of the blank. Turn the blank round and then flip the blank end for end. Repeat the above steps on this end. Now the blank should be perfectly round from end to end. Back the blank into the chuck until only about an inch protrudes and using the center drill hole, drill the blank just past half of the length. Now flip the blank end for end and repeat. This should result in an almost perfect hole that is round and centered, assuming the tailstock isn't moved during the procedure and depending on the accuracy of the metal lathe. It will still be better than using a wood lathe.

This method is quite involved, but you only get out, what you're willing to put in.

I apologize for the lengthy response.
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Old 11-08-2017, 06:09 PM   #28 (permalink)
 
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It’s good practice to start the hole with either a centre drill or a spotting drill before continuing with a conventional drill bit. Centre and spotting drills are not expensive.
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Old 11-08-2017, 07:20 PM   #29 (permalink)
 
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Oh, great. Now I have to tell SWMBO that I need a metal lathe?
I experimented on an acrylic blank. One part I drilled about halfway, stopped the lathe, backed the tailstock out, cleaned out all the fuzzies, inserted the bit, started the lathe and drilled the rest of the way. Very accurate with virtually no gap between the blank and the tube on either end.
The second one a bit different- I drilled and backed out the tailstock and reinserted it while running. This reamed the entrance so that I had to drip thin CA into the gap. Just finished the second filling of CA. Hope it comes out so I can turn it tomorrow and finish the pen.
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Old 11-08-2017, 09:46 PM   #30 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terredax View Post
The problem is the lathe. A wood lathe isn't designed to maintain accuracy when loosening the tailstock and retightening it. There is discrepancies when doing this. The tailstock has enough play, that it will not tighten back into the same position without some extra precautions.



The only way to ensure a perfect hole, is to use a metal lathe using the auto-feed. First, chuck the blank and use a center drill. Then move the tailstock into position to support the end of the blank. Turn the blank round and then flip the blank end for end. Repeat the above steps on this end. Now the blank should be perfectly round from end to end. Back the blank into the chuck until only about an inch protrudes and using the center drill hole, drill the blank just past half of the length. Now flip the blank end for end and repeat. This should result in an almost perfect hole that is round and centered, assuming the tailstock isn't moved during the procedure and depending on the accuracy of the metal lathe. It will still be better than using a wood lathe.



This method is quite involved, but you only get out, what you're willing to put in.



I apologize for the lengthy response.


If you use a dead center in your chuck, you can turn the blank round between centers and not have to reverse it. Quicker and more accurate. Added benefit is I can “trim” the ends on my sander using a simple fence 90 deg to the sand paper. The ID and OD are parallel.

Danny


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