Cutting corners - literally - International Association of Penturners
     International Association of Penturners
Pens for Service Members
 
Support The IAP

Go Back   International Association of Penturners > Community Forums > Penturning
  Forgot Password
Register FAQ Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Penturning General penturning discussions not specifically addressed in one of the specialty forums.


Logged on members can hide ads!

Welcome to penturners.org!

You've found the home of The International Association of Penturners. You are currently viewing our site as a guest, which gives you limited access to view discussions, photos, and library articles.

Consider joining our community today. You'll have full access to all of our content, be able to enter our contests, find local chapters near you, and post your questions and share your experience with our members all over the world.

Membership is completely free!!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-15-2018, 09:23 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Burlington, ON (Toronto area)
Posts: 3
Photos: 0

Default Cutting corners - literally

I watched a YouTube video where someone trimmed the corners of his blank with a band saw, effectively creating an octagonal blank, before turning it on the lathe. I tried it and I guess it took a bit less time to turn the pen but not noticeably so.

Does anyone else do this? If so, why?

Thanks in advance from a newbie.
Mr_Luke is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-15-2018, 09:52 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
MRDucks2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Franklin, IN
Posts: 782
Photos: 0

Default

New Turner here, too, but plan to try a couple like that. I believe they do it for hard to turn wood or plastic blanks to help reduce tear out, chipping or splintering. I believe if your tools are sharp enough and technique good enough itís probably not necessary most of the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Penturners.org mobile app
__________________
Think deeply, Speak gently
Love much, Laugh alot
Work hard, Give freely
Be kind &
Leave The Rest to God
MRDucks2 is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-15-2018, 09:53 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
flyitfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: San Antonio, TX 78247
Posts: 1,605
Photos: 8

Default

I use my disk sander and take the square corners off my blanks. Quick operation and does save time. Also, it reduces chipped corners, especially on the acrylic blanks. Just hold the blanks between my fingers in the tube hole.
Gordon
__________________
SOMETIMES I PRETEND TO BE NORMAL... but it gets boring.....so I go back be being me.

The word 'listen' contains the same letters as the word 'silent. Is that like <<<<<ZIP IT<<<<<<
Likes: (2)
flyitfast is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Advertisement
Old 01-15-2018, 11:13 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Utah
Posts: 2
Photos: 0

Default

Junior High shop teacher here: I trim the corners of acrylic blanks so that there is less chance of novice turners getting catches that cause the blank to stop and the tube to keep spinning...requiring re gluing. Since doing this I have few blanks that I need to re glued.


Sent from my iPad using Penturners.org mobile app
joeyjo is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-15-2018, 11:22 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: TX, NM or on the road
Posts: 1,406
Photos: 0

Default

I used to use a 60 grit flap sander disc while turning it on the lathe to round segmented blanks, but after a comment by George I changed to 40 grit. But I only use that on complicated segmented blanks that I do not want to take a chance on. On a 4 inch grinder they make square round ASAP.
Likes: (2)
dogcatcher is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-16-2018, 02:25 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
robutacion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Australia - SA Adelaide Hills
Posts: 5,646
Photos: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Luke View Post
I watched a YouTube video where someone trimmed the corners of his blank with a band saw, effectively creating an octagonal blank, before turning it on the lathe. I tried it and I guess it took a bit less time to turn the pen but not noticeably so.

Does anyone else do this? If so, why?

Thanks in advance from a newbie.
Depending on what type of wood (hardness) and or type of man-made blank, cutting the corners of the blank on the bandsaw is, in fact, an old technique used by many, some do the same type cuts using the table saw, however, and unless some sort of "jig" is made to hold the blank in place for the cut, manually/holding with your fingers trying to cut the blank corners is most dangerous and can cost you a couple of fingers if not more, sometimes, to save time we do things that are of most crazy nature, some get away with it, some don't...!

I have made a jig for my bandsaw to do just that, I use it only for the Olive wood bulk sales or on some time of my made Resifills (casts) such on some of these but not so much lately on the casts.

The way I see it, this method will help with the amount of wood to turn from the blank BUT, where it may make the most benefit by having the corners removed is to prevent the "impact" on the square corners of a regularly shaped pen blank, from the cutting tool as it rotates, this may force the turner to tighten the mandrel to prevent "spinning" and therefore causing the tube to come unglued from the blank, among other things.

I believe, the flap disc system with a 40 grit, while the blank is on the lathe, is the fastest way to go from square to ROUND and "fairly" close to the dimensions you require and then continue on with the more "traditional" methods of wood/blank finishing.

So, in resume, removing the square corners on the bandsaw or other, of the blank before turning is not in my view used that often, particularly after the turners feels more confident with the turning process, this means that new turners may see more this as a great way to reduce the amount of material to be removed, with time the method is bypassed and the square blanks turned fully on the lathe and with the use of some new tools such as the carbide tipped tools but not only.

Cheers
George
__________________
"Don't give others what you don't like for yourself"

Email: nyodine@yahoo.com.au

Web-Store: https://www.georges-bits-of-timber.com/
Likes: (1)
robutacion is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-16-2018, 07:20 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
WriteON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Lake Worth, Fl
Posts: 1,074
Photos: 0

Default

I’m not comfortable with saws. Band or table. And how much time does it really save. Experienced turners trim & finish pretty fast. To the new turners just take your time .... no reason to cut corners. It’s all about patience and technique.

Mr Luke.... welcome aboard.
__________________

Current set up:
a pair of Jet 1015VS
Jet 1221VS
MidAmericaPool Taig professional pool cue repair lathe....that somehow gets involved with pen blanks.

Last edited by WriteON; 01-16-2018 at 07:40 AM.
Likes: (2)
WriteON is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-16-2018, 07:28 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
BeeAMaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Elkhart IN, USA
Posts: 572
Photos: 0

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MRDucks2 View Post
I believe if your tools are sharp enough and technique good enough itís probably not necessary most of the time.
I'll second that.

After I hand honed my tools, suddenly my Harbor freight tool set became Robert Sorby tools.

With a sharp roughing gouge I can round a square blank faster than I can walk to the sander or band saw.
__________________
When you speak, you repeat what you already know. When you listen you learn...

Get the Pressure Pot Caddy!
Vertical Casting System
The MakerHive

Likes: (2)
BeeAMaker is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-16-2018, 10:34 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
Woodchipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Cleveland, TN
Posts: 1,406
Photos: 1

Default

Never thought of cutting off the corners. Sharp tools and light cuts are the way to go, no matter what material you are turning. When you get the corners knocked off, go for the big chips and ribbons!
__________________
Due to the lack of interest, tomorrow will be cancelled.
Likes: (1)
Woodchipper is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 01-16-2018, 10:43 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 388
Photos: 4

Default

I have done it and used a sander both on some segmented blanks that had odd surfaces. It saves catches on uneven protrusions and is much quicker than fixing a blank with a departed segment.
Likes: (2)
Talltim is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Related Content
Logged on members can hide ads
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:40 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0

Content Copyright © 2003-2018 by Penturners.org, LLC; All Rights Reserved
Terms Of Service   Acceptable Use Policy